Pakistan Anxiety and Depression Questionnaire

Information about Measure
First Name David
Last Name Mumford
Email Not Available
Affiliation Centre for Medical Education, University of Bristol
Other means of contacting author (e.g., website, Academia.edu, ResearchGate)
Mental health assessment tool that was adapted/developed/validated Pakistan Anxiety and Depression Questionnaire
Mental health condition assessed Multiple disorders: Common mental disorders (anxiety and depression)
Idiom of distress included, if any Multiple, including, “Do you feel like running from your home?” and “Do you feel fed up with your family members?”
Lifestage of interest Adult (General)
Age range (age – age)
Country or countries where tool was developed/adapted/validated Pakistan
Language(s) of the adapted/developed/validated tool Urdu
Clinical or community sample? Clinical
Subpopulation in which tool was developed/validated (e.g., tool was developed and tested among middle-class women)?
Development procedures locally-developed, culturally-adapted, validated
If validated, what was the gold standard? Validated using the CD-10 Diagnostic Criteria for Research to identify cases of anxiety and depression.
Description of other development procedures, if applicable
Cronbach’s alpha
Sensitivity 0.95
Spec 0.91
Other information about tool (e.g., additional psychometrics [NPV, PPV, Youden’s index, diagnostic odds ratio]) PPV: 0.91, NPV: 0.95
Citations of development/adaptation/validation studies and/or previous studies using the tool Mumford et al., 2005 D.B. Mumford, M. Ayub, R. Karim, N. Izhar, A. Asif, J.T. Bavington
Development and validation of a questionnaire for anxiety and depression in Pakistan
Journal of Affective Disorders, 88 (2005), pp. 175-182
Notes when administering the tool The questionnaire may be completed by the subject unaided or administered by a research assistant in Urdu. The final tool included 30 items which are summed with equal weight. Based on sensitivity and specificity analyses, a threshold score of 11/12 is advised. The full tool is included in both English and Urdu in the publication cited herein.

Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale- Brazilian version

Information about Measure
First Name Jefferson
Last Name Jovelino Amaral Dos Santos
Email Not Available
Affiliation Universidade Paranaense (Unipar), Toledo, PR, Brazil
Other means of contacting author (e.g., website, Academia.edu, ResearchGate)
Mental health assessment tool that was adapted/developed/validated Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale- Brazilian version
Mental health condition assessed Other: General mental health and well-being
Idiom of distress included, if any Not Applicable
Lifestage of interest Adult (General)
Age range (age – age)
Country or countries where tool was developed/adapted/validated Brazil
Language(s) of the adapted/developed/validated tool Portuguese
Clinical or community sample? Community
Subpopulation in which tool was developed/validated (e.g., tool was developed and tested among middle-class women)? The final version of the scale was administered among college students. During the translation process, a sample ranging in ages from 20-40 was included.
Development procedures Culturally adapted
If validated, what was the gold standard?
Description of other development procedures, if applicable
Cronbach’s alpha 0.89
Sensitivity
Spec
Other information about tool (e.g., additional psychometrics [NPV, PPV, Youden’s index, diagnostic odds ratio])
Citations of development/adaptation/validation studies and/or previous studies using the tool Santos, J. J., Costa, T. A., Guilherme, J. H., Silva, W. C., Abentroth, L. R., Krebs, J. A., & Sotoriva, P. (2015). Adaptation and cross-cultural validation of the Brazilian version of the Warwick-Edinburgh mental well-being scale. Revista Da Associação Médica Brasileira, 61(3), 209-214. doi:10.1590/1806-9282.61.03.209
Notes when administering the tool The scale consists of 14 total items. The final score is calculated by adding up the response of each item, ranging from 1 to 5, obtaining a result from 14 to 70 points, where a higher score is indicative of better mental well-being.

Brazilian Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) – Long Version

Information about Measure
First Name Martha
Last Name Rosa
Email Not Available
Affiliation Departamento de Psiquiatria e Medicina Legal, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
Other means of contacting author (e.g., website, Academia.edu, ResearchGate)
Mental health assessment tool that was adapted/developed/validated Brazilian Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) – Long Version
Mental health condition assessed Depressive disorders
Idiom of distress included, if any Not Applicable
Lifestage of interest Childhood or Adolescence
Age range (age – age) 2019
Country or countries where tool was developed/adapted/validated Brazil
Language(s) of the adapted/developed/validated tool Portuguese
Clinical or community sample? Clinical
Subpopulation in which tool was developed/validated (e.g., tool was developed and tested among middle-class women)? The sample group for this stage was composed of patients and primary caregivers treated at mental health clinics.
Development procedures Culturally adapted
If validated, what was the gold standard?
Description of other development procedures, if applicable The study followed a multi-step validation process from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR).
Cronbach’s alpha
Sensitivity
Spec
Other information about tool (e.g., additional psychometrics [NPV, PPV, Youden’s index, diagnostic odds ratio])
Citations of development/adaptation/validation studies and/or previous studies using the tool Rosa M, Metcalf E, Rocha TB, Kieling C. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) – Long Version. Trends Psychiatry Psychother. 2018;40(1):72-78. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/2237-6089-2017-0019
Notes when administering the tool The tool is intended to measure Major Depressive Disorder in children and adolescents. The tool should either be administered to the adolescents or to their primary caregiver, as is deemed fit by researchers. The tool can be filled out in written form by participants. Each question is rated on a scale of 0, 1, or 2 by participants. Total scores should be calculated by summing each item with equal weight.

Short Form 36 Health Survey- Yoruba Version

Information about Measure
First Name Chidozie
Last Name Mbada
Email Not Available
Affiliation Department of Medical Rehabilitation, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile – Ife, Nigeria
Other means of contacting author (e.g., website, Academia.edu, ResearchGate) https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Chidozie_Mbada
Mental health assessment tool that was adapted/developed/validated Short Form 36 Health Survey- Yoruba Version
Mental health condition assessed Multiple disorders: Health-related quality of life, including general mental health
Idiom of distress included, if any Not Applicable
Lifestage of interest Adult (General)
Age range (age – age) 18-70
Country or countries where tool was developed/adapted/validated Nigeria
Language(s) of the adapted/developed/validated tool Yoruba
Clinical or community sample? Community
Subpopulation in which tool was developed/validated (e.g., tool was developed and tested among middle-class women)? Tool was adapted among students, workers, and residents of Ile-Ife, in Osun state.
Development procedures Culturally adapted
If validated, what was the gold standard?
Description of other development procedures, if applicable
Cronbach’s alpha >0.70
Sensitivity
Spec
Other information about tool (e.g., additional psychometrics [NPV, PPV, Youden’s index, diagnostic odds ratio])
Citations of development/adaptation/validation studies and/or previous studies using the tool Mbadaet al. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes (2015) 13:141 DOI 10.1186/s12955-015-0337-y
Notes when administering the tool The tool should be administered by a trained research assistant in the Yoruba language. As with other versions of the SF-36, the Yoruba translation consists of eight subscales and the sum score on each is the weighted sum of the questions for that section. Each scale is transformed into a 0-100 scale on the assumption that each question carries equal weight. Total scores are then summed from each subscale, with lower scores denoting more disability.